I recently came across an article detailing what I’d heard before: Mars has experienced a global temperature increase similar to the Earth’s. Unless the government is covering up even more than I think they are, man-made activities are certainly not contributing to that global warming. I mean, a couple of robots gathering rocks couldn’t possibly emit enough carbon dioxide to affect Mars. If so, maybe we could send a few more and get some plants going up there, but I digress.

The point here is that, if a planet completely outside our control is showing a similar warming trend to our planet, maybe we should look at a different source. Even more plain than the proverbial elephant in the room is the giant ball of fire tracing its way across our sky every day. Interestingly enough, the sun went through a historically high peak in activity from 1998-2005 that matches the historic temperatures (even allowing for intentional and unintentional skewing of thermometer data). Since then temperatures have been dropping, and the sun is currently in a prolonged minimum in activity that has some scientists comparing it to the Maunder minimum.

From 1645 to 1715 astronomers noticed that sunspots grew extremely rare. Further research shows that there was an associated period of cool temperatures known as the Little Ice Age (that followed several warmer years known as the Medieval Warm Period). Hmm…could it be that we’re seeing another similar pattern?

In the current solar cycle, scientists keep extending the forecast for the next solar maximum. This minimum has lasted longer than any for quite a while. By now we should have been seeing much more activity, well on our way to a solar maximum in late 2012 or early 2013. But even though there has been slightly more activity, we have dropped back off and are again seeing a week or so at a time with no spots on the sun (during the last two years there were periods of 100+ spotless days). So the current adjusted prediction is for a lower solar maximum than the last one, occurring in around 2015. There is still so much to learn about solar activity, so who knows if that will pan out?

All that to add more weight to the gathering data refuting man-made, or anthropogenic global warming (AGW).